The Tragedy of Fukushima Is A Tragedy For All Mankind

The Tragedy of Fukushima is not yet fully known, at least not in terms of the long-term effects of the radiation released today and tomorrow, perhaps for mankind’s entire “half-lifetime.” We don’t know (meaning our best scientists don’t know) what will grow out of the hole which has been blasted in our collective consciences today. Our knowledge of atomic science, just like our understanding of all earth science, is in its infancy, yet we have chosen to build nuclear reactors in geologically risky locations. Beyond the risky siting problems, lie the earth forces of wind and water, which we only now beginning to see.

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UN: Eco-Farming Feeds The World

For years now, the most-asked question by detractors of the good food movement has been, “Can organic agriculture feed the world?” According to a new United Nations report, the answer is a big, fat yes. The report, Agro-ecology and the Right to Food, released yesterday, reveals that small-scale sustainable farming would even double food production within five to 10 years in places where most hungry people on the planet live.

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Fracking Effects On Western Air, Water Exposed By Leaked EPA Documents

A Sunday New York Times expose highlighting the environmental and health impacts of natural gas extraction is already drawing being cited by legislators as grounds to toughen federal regulations on the industry.

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How Markets May Respond To Resource Scarcity: The Goldilocks Syndrome

The standard economic assumption is that, as a resource becomes scarce, prices will rise until some other resource that can fill the same need becomes cheaper by comparison. What really happens, when there is no ready substitute, can perhaps best be explained with the help of a little recent history and an old children’s story. How long prices can stay in or near the Goldilocks range is anyone’s guess (as of this writing, oil is trading in New York for over $90 per barrel), but as declines in production in the world’s old super-giant oilfields continue to accelerate and exploration costs continue to mount, the lower boundary of that just-right range will inevitably continue to migrate upward. And while the world economy remains frail, its vulnerability to high energy prices is more pronounced, so that even $80-85 oil could gradually weaken it further, choking off signs of recovery.

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Conference Puts Food Economy On Table

Transition Colorado is the reorganized, combined version of nonprofits Transition Boulder and Boulder County Going Local. Got that? Well, all you have to know is that the new mission is a modern twist on “Think globally, act locally.” Transition Colorado puts that kind of thinking into action in a number of ways.

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Energy: What Actually Matters

One of the pervasive mistakes made by people in the industrial world these days – oh, all right, made by most Americans and a much smaller number of people elsewhere – is the notion that the only thing that matters when you’re dealing with heat is having enough energy to produce it. Every autumn, accordingly, you can go to your local department store and find scores of portable heaters waiting for you in serried ranks, so that you can turn electricity or propane or what have you into plenty of heat wherever you want it. You can do that, but unless you do something to encourage the heat to stay around for a while, it’s not going to work very well, and it’s also going to cost you plenty, because producing heat is only the first part of what matters; the rest of the equation, which is in many ways the most important part, is keeping the heat from leaving the place you put it any sooner than it has to.

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Earth’s Limits: Why Growth Won’t Return

We have just seen why, since 2007, growth has languished for reasons internal to the world financial system—the system of money and debt. Problems arising from speculative overreach, real estate bubbles, and the inherent Ponzi dynamics of our global debt-based financial structures are endemic and profound. Still, if these were our only difficulties, we might reasonably expect that eventually, once they are sorted out (however painful the process may be), growth will return. Indeed, that is what nearly everyone assumes. It’s a matter of “when,” not “if” growth resumes.
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WikiLeaks Cables: Saudia Arabia Cannot Pump Enough Oil To Keep A Lid On Prices

The US fears that Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest crude oil exporter, may not have enough reserves to prevent oil prices escalating, confidential cables from its embassy in Riyadh show. The cables, released by WikiLeaks, urge Washington to take seriously a warning from a senior Saudi government oil executive that the kingdom’s crude oil reserves may have been overstated by as much as 300bn barrels – nearly 40%.

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Rising Food And Energy Prices Could Be Here To Stay

Josette Sheeran at the UN’s World Food Programme puts it well: “If people don’t have enough to eat they only have three options: they can revolt, they can migrate or they can die.” Shortages of all commodities can cause hardship, but only food and water exact the ultimate price. It is no wonder that spiralling prices are grabbing the headlines again.

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Natural Gas Shortages Reported Across Several U.S. States

After numerous winter storms and sustained cold temperatures have struck across the nation, several US states are experiencing shortages in natural gas supplies. This winter season has been particularly cold for several US states, as numerous reports have emerged of natural gas shortages.
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